Evan Michel, M.A. 2020-08-07T18:17:58-04:00

Evan Michel, M.A.

FELLOW IN MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING

Evan Michel is a Fellow in Mental Health Counseling at the Boston Child Study Center offering evidence-based treatment to children, adolescents, young adults, and parents. He provides dialectical (DBT), cognitive-behavioral (CBT), and acceptance and commitment therapies (ACT) for youth and families facing emotional dysregulation and mood and anxiety disorders.

Evan earned his B.A. in psychology from Bates College before working in clinical research at Massachusetts General Hospital and in direct care as a mental health specialist at Franciscan Hospital for Children’s Community-Based Acute Treatment (CBAT) program. He has earned his Master’s in Counseling Psychology from Boston College’s Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology program where he is currently completing his Ph.D.

Evan has extensive training and experience in individual, family, and group therapy and assessment in acute and outpatient settings. He completed his clinical practica at the McLean-Franciscan Child & Adolescent Inpatient Mental Health Program, The Walker School, and the Adolescent Assessment Unit at Cambridge Health Alliance. Evan completed his predoctoral internship as the Weil Intern at Harvard Medical School/Cambridge Health Alliance offering outpatient treatment for children, adolescents, and families and psychological assessment for children and adolescents during inpatient programming. His post-internship fellowship was at Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital’s Adolescent Acute Residential Treatment (ART) program, where he provided treatment to adolescents within an acute treatment setting.

Evan continued as a group therapist at McLean’s residential and partial hospital program where he has supported group programming for adolescents and parents. He values culturally-minded care and offers an integrative approach from DBT, CBT, ACT, and developmental systems perspectives to support treatment of a range of clinical concerns including emotion dysregulation, anxiety, depression, trauma, and suicidal behaviors.